RESIDENTS have less than 10 days to opt out of the automatic creation of an online health summary, set to be rolled out nationally this year.

Geelong region health professionals have indicated their support for the My Health Record system, with figures revealing 94 per cent of local general practices are already registered.

The online personal health history provides health care workers with a summary of patients' medical conditions, allergies, past treatments, prescribed medicines and pathology test results.

Western Victoria PHN chief executive Leanne Beagley said it had been working with the Australian Digital Health Agency to raise awareness of the initiative.

"In the Greater Geelong region we have had a significant registrations to My Health Record. Ninety-four per cent of general practices are registered and 26 per cent of pharmacies, and numbers are continuing to grow," Dr Beagley said.

By the end of this year, a personal electronic health profile will be created for every Australian who does not opt out, as part of a significant but controversial healthcare reform.

People have until November 15 to object to the establishment of their My Health Record - a system already being used by than 6.26 million Australians.

An ADHA spokesman said as of last week the opt out rate was about 1.147 million - less than 5 per cent of the population.

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare will be the custodian of the information, but patients will be able to self-manage some aspects, such as setting access controls for who can see certain information.

They can also add an advanced care plan and custodian details, review the information to see everything healthcare providers can see and set up a notification system that alerts them when a health care provider first accesses the record.

It is also hoped to ensure co-ordinated care, reduce the duplication of pathology and imaging investigations, and prevent medication errors.

For more information, or to opt out, visit myhealthrecord.com.au.

Source: The Geelong Advertiser and The Daily Telegraph